How to distort reality

2013 visits to GenuineEvaluation.com (total 28.470)

Posted by: Jane Davidson & Patricia Rogers

 

What’s not to love about the great ideas for data visualization that have taken evaluation by storm over the past few years? Awesome!

Perhaps not the most visually stunning example, but here’s Google Analytics’ map of where Genuine Evaluation’s 28,470 visits came from last year (2013).

Read the whole post –> How to distort reality

The Friday Funny: Harvard’s Grading Rubric

Photo source: seeminglee on flickr

After last week’s popular podcast on using rubrics in evaluation (Jane was interviewed by James and Kylie on Adventures in Evaluation), we were delighted when the New York Times published the real rubric used at Harvard University for grading student work!

Here’s a snippet from the first section

Read the whole post –> The Friday Funny: Harvard’s Grading Rubric

Self evaluation in complex organizations – including universities

Saville Kushner

Posted by: Jane Davidson

What are complex organizations doing right when it comes to evaluation, and where are they missing opportunities to apply their own best practices in other areas?

Saville Kushner keynoting at AES 2013

There is much that universities (and other organizations) do right, particularly in some of their intradisciplinary

Read the whole post –> Self evaluation in complex organizations – including universities

Evaluation Rubrics podcast: Jane Davidson interviewed on Adventures in Evaluation!

adventuresineval

Posted by: Jane Davidson

It’s been a fun couple of weeks, and one of the highlights for me was a guest appearance on James Coyle and Kylie Hutchinson’s Adventures in Evaluation podcast series!

We talked about:

how and why I started using rubrics in evaluation (the answer to this might surprise you!) what rubrics

Read the whole post –> Evaluation Rubrics podcast: Jane Davidson interviewed on Adventures in Evaluation!

The Friday Funny: The very best totally wrong test answers

F-in-exams

When can a wrong answer be better than a right one?

As evaluators, we all know the answer to that question in a program/policy/project evaluation space:

When the unintended effects turned out to be even better than the intended effects that weren’t achieved!

Here’s a cute example of the same thing pulled from

Read the whole post –> The Friday Funny: The very best totally wrong test answers