Case Studies of Evaluators’ Lives: A cultural perspective (yes, culture!)

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From: Jane Davidson

The panel line-up was not one you would even remotely expect to see sponsored by any of the TIGs with a focus on culture. They were five senior white male Americans including some of the pioneers of the profession’s early development in the United States: Michael Scriven, Bob Stake, Ernie

Read the whole post –> Case Studies of Evaluators’ Lives: A cultural perspective (yes, culture!)

The Friday Funny: RADI-AID (Africa for Norway)

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Here’s a gently satirical treat to take you into the holiday season and give us food for thought as evaluators.

How much do sterotypes drive the way needs and outcomes are reported in cultures other than our own?

Or, as this group of African students in Norway puts it on their Africa for Norway

Read the whole post –> The Friday Funny: RADI-AID (Africa for Norway)

Interview with the President! A new podcast from Genuine Evaluation

Rodney Hopson

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This week we hinted on twitter that we’d have a high-profile guest to interview.

Today, Jane Davidson interviews the President! [Sorry, folks; we couldn’t resist playing with this in the run-up to the US elections! We debated it and agreed before we started the interview, of course. ]

Yes, it’s Professor Rodney Hopson, president

Read the whole post –> Interview with the President! A new podcast from Genuine Evaluation

Why “What’s the best tool to measure the effectiveness of X?” is totally the wrong question

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Time after time in online discussion groups I see questions like this one:

“What are the best tools to measure the effectiveness of [insert any program, policy, or initiative]?”

It’s a classic case of thinking evaluation is merely measurement, and measurement gives you the answers.

Many managers and non-evaluators think like this – that

Read the whole post –> Why “What’s the best tool to measure the effectiveness of X?” is totally the wrong question

The two second advantage and memories of the future

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Stuart Henderson’s mention of The Two Second Advantage (see the LinkedIn discussion referred to in the post from earlier this week) reminds me of the work of business strategist Arie De Geus, who discusses how learning organizations use scenario planning to create “memories of the future”.

It seems to me that this idea has

Read the whole post –> The two second advantage and memories of the future