AES keynote Prof Trisha Greenhalgh slams govt leaders’ notions of “scientific” evaluation

A warm and informative welcome this morning from the indigenous Kaurna people was followed by a brilliant keynote from Dr. Trisha Greenhalgh, Professor of Primary Health Care and Director of Healthcare Innovation and Policy Unit in the Centre for Health Sciences at Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry. Trisha talked about “the good, the bad, and the ugly” of evaluating e-health programmes in Britain. She had strong words about “gagging order” clauses in evaluation contracts, as well as government client uses of the “5 D’s” in response to evaluation findings they don’t care for: deny, denigrate, dismiss, distract, distort.

Read the whole post –> AES keynote Prof Trisha Greenhalgh slams govt leaders’ notions of “scientific” evaluation

Update on ‘alpine whaling’ – scientific grazing

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Photo: Trevor Pinder, Herald Sun

We recently reported on some curious developments in evidence-based policy in the state of Victoria in Australia, where the newly-elected State Government had overturned previous policy to keep cattle out of alpine national parks, arguing there was insufficient evidence to support this.

Now the federal government (which is

Read the whole post –> Update on ‘alpine whaling’ – scientific grazing

Whatever happened to evidence-based policy? Episode 1

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I had thought most governments were now largely avowed supporters of evidence-based policy. Some recent examples from Australia have made me wonder what’s going on. Here’s the first of a worrying series.

1. Target 155

This program aimed to get Melbournians to reduce their residential water consumption to 155 litres per person per day.

Read the whole post –> Whatever happened to evidence-based policy? Episode 1

Friday Funny – community engagement and evidence-based policy

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Policy that is developed in response to clearly identified needs and through careful processes of community engagement – while being feasible in an adversarial political system and short timeframes? Time for the Hollowmen to show us how it can be done.

Read the whole post –> Friday Funny – community engagement and evidence-based policy

Sincerity in evaluation – highlights and lowlights

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image from zazzle.com

Principles of Genuine Evaluation

When we set out to explore the notion of ‘Genuine Evaluation’, we identified 5 important aspects of it:

VALUE-BASED -transparent and defensible values (criteria of merit and worth and standards of performance) EMPIRICAL – credible evidence about what has happened and what has caused this, USABLE

Read the whole post –> Sincerity in evaluation – highlights and lowlights