Self evaluation in complex organizations – including universities

Saville Kushner

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Posted by: Jane Davidson

What are complex organizations doing right when it comes to evaluation, and where are they missing opportunities to apply their own best practices in other areas?

Saville Kushner keynoting at AES 2013

There is much that universities (and other organizations) do right, particularly in some of their intradisciplinary

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The Friday Funny: Acceptance of evaluative conclusions

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It was Michael Scriven‘s birthday this week, which is a fine time to introduce our Friday Funny with a short quote from the Evaluation Thesaurus, which lists the following entry. As evaluators, we are all familiar with this phenomenon in our work or everyday lives, in one form or another:

KILL THE MESSENGER (phenomenon)

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The Friday Funny: Things Not To Say at a Job Interview

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Personnel evaluation is always a rich source of evaluation humor – and often with interesting parallel implications for program, policy and project evaluation. Here’s a classic that’s done the rounds on the Internet; we found this one at Pinetree.com’s inbox humor file.

We’ve all been interviewed for jobs. And, we’ve all spent most of

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Cool ideas from personnel evaluation: Evaluative rubrics

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Well, this week is Evaluation Week at SIOP (the Society for Industrial & Organizational Psychology) and SIOP week on the AEA365 blog. So, it’s a good time to consider some of the synergies across the two disciplines.

My doctoral training was in organizational psychology (with some industrial psyc at Master’s level), which is the

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The Friday Funny: Performance evaluation translations

Performance appraisals, like many program and policy evaluations, often contain ‘coded’ language to diplomatically convey evaluative feedback. It’s always helpful to have a translation guide for those not used to reading (or writing) such ‘code’ … and to ponder the more serious question of whether the ‘code’ might actually be so obscure that evaluation readers/users won’t actually get the subtleties (and may even infer the opposite from the truth) …

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