Friday funny – drawing conclusions

The second-funniest joke in the world, according to Richard Wiseman’s LaughLab, was the joke submitted by Geoff Anandappa of Blackpool, which is clearly about the importance of focusing on key messages in evaluation summaries.

Sherlock Holmes and Dr Watson were going camping. They pitched their tent under the stars and went to sleep. Sometime in the middle of the night Holmes woke Watson up and said: “Watson, look up at the stars, and tell me what you see.”

Watson replied: “I see millions and millions of stars.”

Holmes said: “And what do you deduce from that?”

Watson replied: “Well, if there are millions of stars, and if even a few of those have planets, it’s quite likely there are some planets like earth out there. And if there are a few planets like earth out there, there might also be life.”

And Holmes said: “Watson, you idiot, it means that somebody stole our tent.”

The version on Wikipedia is even more appropriate:

Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson go on a camping trip, and after finishing their dinner they retire for the night, and go to sleep. Some hours later, Holmes wakes up and nudges his faithful friend.”Watson, look up at the sky and tell me what you see.”

“I see millions and millions of stars, Holmes” exclaims Watson.

“And what do you deduce from that?”

Watson ponders for a minute. “Well, astronomically, it tells me that there are millions of galaxies and potentially billions of planets. Astrologically, I observe that Saturn is in Leo. Horologically, I deduce that the time is approximately a quarter past three. Meteorologically, I suspect that we will have a beautiful day tomorrow. Theologically, I can see that God is all powerful, and that we are a small and insignificant part of the universe. What does it tell you, Holmes?”

“Watson, you idiot!” He exclaims, “Somebody’s stolen our tent!”

1 comment to Friday funny – drawing conclusions

  • Nan Wehipeihana

    Love it!

    And thinking about your evaluation practice, which of these two approaches – Holmes or Sherlock – most typifies your analysis and reporting of evaluation findings?