Case Studies of Evaluators’ Lives: A cultural perspective (yes, culture!)

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From: Jane Davidson

The panel line-up was not one you would even remotely expect to see sponsored by any of the TIGs with a focus on culture. They were five senior white male Americans including some of the pioneers of the profession’s early development in the United States: Michael Scriven, Bob Stake, Ernie

Read the whole post –> Case Studies of Evaluators’ Lives: A cultural perspective (yes, culture!)

The Friday Funny: Translating English into English

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In evaluation we are often having to either translate evaluation jargon into plain language, or communicate intent and findings in languages other than our own.

It’s perhaps a little-known fact, though, how sometimes we even need English-to-English translation. Because of course what certain phrases mean in one culture may be quite different from what

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The Friday Funny: What’s a “valuable outcome”?

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When conducting evaluation in cultures and contexts other than our own, one important principle is to avoid imposing inappropriate definitions of what outcomes should be considered valuable when defining what “success” looks like.

This classic consultant joke also teaches another lesson:

If you genuinely open your ears and eyes to the local culture and

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Culturally Competent Needs Assessment By an “Outsider”

What does it take for an outsider to do a community needs assessment in cultural contexts that are deeply entrenched in traditions and norms?

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How to spot a ‘lip service’ approach to culturally responsive evaluation (a checklist for evaluation clients)

So you’ve put out an RFP for an evaluation of a policy, program or initiative intended to serve and effect positive change in a “minority” community. All the proposals look terribly impressive, and they all include “cultural experts” on the evaluation team. How can you distinguish the proposals that show a clear understanding of what it takes to do effective and culturally responsive evaluations from those that merely pay ‘lip service’ to cultural competence?

Read the whole post –> How to spot a ‘lip service’ approach to culturally responsive evaluation (a checklist for evaluation clients)