‘Minirubrics’ – 7 hot tips for using this cool tool to focus evaluative conversations

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Posted by: Jane Davidson

Looking for an easy-to-grasp and much more compact alternative to rubrics? Try a minirubric!

A minirubric is a cross between a rating scale and a short rubric.

Hot tip #1: These aren’t an alternative to careful evaluative reasoning informed by the right mix of evidence, but (like full-size rubrics)

Read the whole post –> ‘Minirubrics’ – 7 hot tips for using this cool tool to focus evaluative conversations

Podcast! Jane talks with Stephanie Evergreen about awesome reporting

Dr. Stephanie Evergreen at the 2014 ANZEA conference

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Dr. Stephanie Evergreen at the 2014 ANZEA conference

Dataviz queen Stephanie Evergreen recently visited New Zealand and caught up with Jane Davidson to talk about truly awesome reporting, the stuff that gets straight to the point – and conveys it brilliantly!

This 23-minute podcast is the second of a series of four from

Read the whole post –> Podcast! Jane talks with Stephanie Evergreen about awesome reporting

The world’s first evaluation e-minibook? Actionable Evaluation Basics

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The evaluation community has long discussed the rising prices of evaluation texts and guides, and the difficulties of accessing a good selection of evaluation books and resources in some parts of the world.

Some of the heaviest selling texts are now clocking in at over US$100, which is also hefty for graduate students buying

Read the whole post –> The world’s first evaluation e-minibook? Actionable Evaluation Basics

Great leaders think evaluatively

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photo by karigee on Flickr

“Great leaders think strategically.”

So opens a March 2012 article from Forbes magazine entitled How to Develop 5 Critical Thinking Types.

The article goes on to list the five types of critical thinking that allow leaders to “strike a balance between visualizing what might or could be and

Read the whole post –> Great leaders think evaluatively

Why “What’s the best tool to measure the effectiveness of X?” is totally the wrong question

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Time after time in online discussion groups I see questions like this one:

“What are the best tools to measure the effectiveness of [insert any program, policy, or initiative]?”

It’s a classic case of thinking evaluation is merely measurement, and measurement gives you the answers.

Many managers and non-evaluators think like this – that

Read the whole post –> Why “What’s the best tool to measure the effectiveness of X?” is totally the wrong question