“Genuine evaluation” snippets from across the globe

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What does the term “genuine evaluation” mean to the rest of the planet, including those who don’t identify as “evaluators”?

We’ve collated a few snippets from our Google Alerts file to give a picture that is sometimes humorous, sometimes actually very insightful. Of particular interest as we refine our thinking are the similar themes

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Business leaders learning from ‘stuff ups’

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In response to an earlier post, Caroline Heider asked the million-dollar question:

How does one develop .. a culture [of reflective or evaluative thinking] when it is not intrinsic or when incentives exist to share information only about success/the positive (real or the “nicer message”) and fear to speak about things that may not

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Learning from failures – the case of oil spills

How well have different oil companies, drilling companies, and countries learned from oil spill disasters in the past? In this video, MSNBC’s Rachel Maddox highlights the eerie similarities between the huge Gulf of Mexico oil spill in 1979 and the deja vu version happening as we speak. How well have different governments learned from oil spill failures and incorporated those learnings into regulations? Some governments have clearly learned MUCH better than others. How well have oil and drilling companies learned how to effectively manage spills like this in the absence of an existing relief well? The know-how apparently exists but isn’t being used properly – for some rather unbelievable reasons.

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Languaging in evaluation – raising fewer hackles vs. clarity of message

Languaging (finding ways for difficult or complex ideas to make sense in different contexts) is a very important issue for getting people to buy into (and take action based on) evaluation findings, particularly when some aspect of a program is not doing well. Positive languaging can be highly effective for getting stakeholders to buy into not-so-positive findings. However, we do need to be wary of defaulting to positive, ‘comfort zone’ language all the time….

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Analyzing failure in criminal justice reform

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The Center for Court Innovation has embarked on a project that seems very relevant to our recent discussions about learning from failure (or from less than total success):

The Center for Court Innovation, with the support of the U.S. Department of Justice’s Bureau of Justice Assistance, has embarked on a multi-faceted inquiry designed to

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