‘Minirubrics’ – 7 hot tips for using this cool tool to focus evaluative conversations

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Posted by: Jane Davidson

Looking for an easy-to-grasp and much more compact alternative to rubrics? Try a minirubric!

A minirubric is a cross between a rating scale and a short rubric.

Hot tip #1: These aren’t an alternative to careful evaluative reasoning informed by the right mix of evidence, but (like full-size rubrics)

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Boxers or briefs? Why having a favorite response scale makes no sense

Tweet To what extent do you agree or disagree with the following?

“Boxers are more comfortable than briefs”

Strongly Agree … [insert favorite response scale length/format] … Strongly Disagree

(pics on Sodahead)

Time after time I see debates about whether response scales should have an even or odd number of

Read the whole post –> Boxers or briefs? Why having a favorite response scale makes no sense

The Friday Funny: Top ten things you’ll never hear from the researcher you hired to do an evaluation

Tweet Top ten things you’ll never hear from the researcher you hired to do an evaluation Let’s make sure the findings are ready in time for key decision points – even if that means getting just an approximate answer for you Oh yes, evaluation expertise is paramount for getting this right; that’s why we have

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Opinion or evidence? Are working hours getting longer?

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Pic by JitterBuffer

Over the Antipodean summer Genuine Evaluation goes to the beach instead of blogging. We’re back now, brushing off the sand, and planning more discussions about what it means to do genuine evaluation, plus sharing some insights from the African evaluation conference in Accra, Ghana.

To start the year, we

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Breaking out of the Likert scale trap

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A recent conversation with a colleague has reminded me of how traditional social science training has managed to hardwire our brains into some default thinking that needs to be questioned.

Obviously, there are a lot of places one could go with this as an opening statement, but for now, let’s look at the design

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