The Friday Funny: Measurement conversions

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For those new to metrics – and as the sizes of computer hard drives increase astronomically each year – it can be hard to stay on top of all that “giga-this” and “terra-that” terminology. Here’s a helpful guide that’s done the rounds on the Internet (we found it at Michelle’s Joke Vault):

1. Ratio

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Free webinar on measurement, risk and uncertainty

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One of the important features of genuine evaluation is appropriate measurement, including dealing with uncertainty, as I was reminded by Chris Coryn of the Evaluation Center at Western Michigan University, in our discussions at the International Summer School on Public Policy Evaluation Research last week.

A free webinar on 16 September 10.30am – 11.30am

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The risks of focusing on the easy-to-measure

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Some more developments in UK development funding, an issue we looked at in a post a few weeks ago.

Lawrence Haddad, Director of the Institute for Development Studies has an interesting article in the Guardian in response to David Cameron’s statements on international aid.

The best ways to deliver overseas aid are often not

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What you measure and how you measure it – the Greek financial example

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A salutary reminder that just because things are measured precisely (such as money) doesn’t mean that the measurements are valid or useful. As reported by Louise Story, Landon Thomas Jr and Nelson D. Schwartz, in the New York Times on 13 Feb 2010 :

As in the American subprime crisis and the implosion of

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The Impact-o-meter

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Is certainty of measurement the most important criterion for impact evaluation? Colin Burrows has set forward a tongue-in-cheek proposal for measuring the impact of research undertaken in universities – the Impact-o-meter. This satirical piece raises serious questions about the cost, precision and implications of measuring impact.

As an aside, Australia had developed a framework

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