Valuing processes and distribution of costs and benefits as well as outcomes

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As part of our exploration of the need for making explicit the values in evaluation, let’s be clear that this is not just about what outcomes are valued. Sometimes we are not just interested in whether we’ve reached a destination, we’re concerned about the path we’ve taken to reach it.

Pic from http://noimpactman.typepad.com

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“Genuine evaluation” snippets from across the globe

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What does the term “genuine evaluation” mean to the rest of the planet, including those who don’t identify as “evaluators”?

We’ve collated a few snippets from our Google Alerts file to give a picture that is sometimes humorous, sometimes actually very insightful. Of particular interest as we refine our thinking are the similar themes

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Friday Funny – How impact really works

“When people laugh, it is easier for them to admit new ideas to their minds.” (Dalai Lama, in an interview with John Cleese). Terry Smutylo shows how serious issues in evaluation theory and practice can be communicated (and shared) in his song the “Output Outcome Downstream Impact Blues’. Check details for tour dates and the karoake version.

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Why genuine evaluation must include causal inference

Is it OK to just document whatever changes happen to people over the life of the program and summarize these in an evaluation report under a heading called “Outcomes”? What if you point out in a disclaimer that you haven’t got any evidence that the program contributed to them? What if you don’t exactly call them “outcomes”? What if it’s just a low-budget evaluation? Answers: No, no, no, and NO! Here’s why …

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