Don’t expect quantitative evidence to answer a qualitative evaluation question

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A while back I authored a post called Breaking out of the Likert scale trap in which I suggested that, for evaluation work, we might consider transforming more descriptive survey items like this one …

To what extent do you agree or disagree with the following:

strongly disagree

disagree neutral

Read the whole post –> Don’t expect quantitative evidence to answer a qualitative evaluation question

Boxers or briefs? Why having a favorite response scale makes no sense

Tweet To what extent do you agree or disagree with the following?

“Boxers are more comfortable than briefs”

Strongly Agree … [insert favorite response scale length/format] … Strongly Disagree

(pics on Sodahead)

Time after time I see debates about whether response scales should have an even or odd number of

Read the whole post –> Boxers or briefs? Why having a favorite response scale makes no sense

Approximate answers to the ‘overall value’ question – 5 more survey and interview item ideas

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Well, we had a mini theme last week of tips, tricks, and ideas for designing survey (questionnaire) items that cut to the evaluative chase. All these can be used in structured and semi-structured interviews too, of course.

As a follow-up, I wanted to pursue a little more the notion of whether – and what

Read the whole post –> Approximate answers to the ‘overall value’ question – 5 more survey and interview item ideas

Breaking out of the Likert scale trap

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A recent conversation with a colleague has reminded me of how traditional social science training has managed to hardwire our brains into some default thinking that needs to be questioned.

Obviously, there are a lot of places one could go with this as an opening statement, but for now, let’s look at the design

Read the whole post –> Breaking out of the Likert scale trap