The Friday Funny: The Venn Piagram

As a belated follow-up to Mel Mark’s Evaluation Pie contribution to the 2011 AEA conference, we just had to share this mouthwatering gem for the amusement (and gastronomic tantalization) of evaluators around the globe …

The Venn Piagram

We got this masterpiece from flowingdata.com.

[A little late for this as a Friday Funny because

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Does testing for statistical significance encourage or discourage thoughtful data analysis?

In light of Jane’s post yesterday on Sizeless Science, it’s interesting to consider the position outlined in a policy statement in Epidemiology,the Official Journal of the International Society for Environmental Epidemiology. (Rothman, K. J. (1998). Special article: Writing for epidemiology. Epidemiology, 9(3):333–337). which argues not only for thoughtful interpretation of findings, but for not

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Long-term effects; what to do with them and without them

Greetings, genuwiners! Thought I’d toss a small puzzle into the stream of discussions to start my visit.

Ideally, almost all program evaluations need to include a long term follow up, but almost none of the clients can wait for long-term results, so we rarely have the chance to provide one of these. This means

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Does regression to the mean explain successful diet programs?

We might remember ‘regression to the mean‘ from those lists of threats to validity (in terms of causal analysis). But when is it actually likely to be a problem for genuine evaluation? In a recent post by Rebecca Goldin on the stats.org blog, “Why any ol’ diet will work (if your BMI is high

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